In response, some people choose terribly cumbersome names. They find out that “Tshirt.com” is taken and then learn that “HockeyTshirt.com” is also taken. So they create an unworkable domain name like VeryCool-HockeyTshirt.com. Not only is it too long, it contains a hyphen, which should be avoided (some users forget to put them in, sending them to your competitor’s site.)
To help you reduce the risk of investing your time and energy in something nobody wants, we’ve created a guide to validating your membership site idea. Some of the things you can try include producing a mini version of your membership program to see if you can generate any signups before creating the whole course, as well as promoting a prelaunch offer, again, to see if you can find members willing to register, perhaps at a reduced rate, before you get started.
Of course, you will ‘sell’ this offer with professional sales copy, some great headlines, and maybe even some bullet points. But the general idea here is to introduce yourself to this new cold traffic visitor, let them know what you are about, let them know that you can help them, and convince them that the first step to solving their problem is to opt-in to your free offer. 

Check that the SET ACTION on all your buttons are correct.Speaking of buttons, check all your buttons to make sure the set action is correct. If you just have a sales page and want the button to take people to the next page, you choose NEXT STEP. But, if you are taking information from people (email opt-ins or contact info), the action must be set to SUBMIT FORM. Then it will automatically send them to the next step in the funnel. There are also actions to show/hide elements, take people to certain spots on a page, and the option to write in a custom link.
After the idea comes the execution. Setting up your Shopify store doesn’t take that much time to complete, but it’s important to finish all the steps so your website looks like a professional online store. Plus, there are a few really key things on this list – like setting up your payment details, which help you get paid (so they’re a pretty big deal!). Here’s some of the store set-up tasks you’ll want to cross off your ecommerce checklist:
If your eCommerce sells big brand names be sure to include their logo wherever possible. Having logos of big brands gives the customer an indication of what type of product you sell — plus, it adds some authenticity and prestige to your brand for being affiliated with industry leaders. Here’s an example of how Best Buy utilizes logos on their site:
Consumer Trends – Just because something is popular domestically doesn’t mean it will be internationally. Are they behind in a trend –– or does it just not apply for that market? If you don’t already have sales in a region, do consumer testing and surveys before you ever launch. Know that most businesses that expand internationally already have sales in a particular region before they launch specifically in that country.
Solid and Flexible Product Navigation: this is a subject that could go on for ever. Our recommendation is that you look at new ways to extend product and site navigation based on current user actions and possibly experiments you run with users. If you don’t currently have a search feature, ask some users whether it would be a substantial gain to have one. Look at different ways to categorize product and build new filters. Then look at how they get used, and make further changes based on those results. You may end of up with something that not only makes it easier for your customers to find the products they are looking for, but a significant differentiation over your competition.

Excessive dependence of checklists may hinder performance when dealing with a time-critical situation, for example a medical emergency or an in-flight emergency. Checklists should not be used as a replacement for common sense. Intensive training including rote-learning of checklists can help integrate use of checklists with more adaptive and flexible problem solving techniques.[citation needed]
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