Product matching: in apparel, jewelry, and other specific types of product sales websites, offering a generalized “recommended products” in the lower part of the product detail page is often not enough. Consider setting up specific matches, for example, this pair of earrings goes well with that necklace. Think of it as the editorial content of the site that customers will appreciate, because you have taken the time to not only know your product, but give them direct guidance on what goes with what. If you don’t think this applies to you, think about it and see if there is something similar you can offer for your products, as it yet another way to increase per-order averages.
Solid and Flexible Product Navigation: this is a subject that could go on for ever. Our recommendation is that you look at new ways to extend product and site navigation based on current user actions and possibly experiments you run with users. If you don’t currently have a search feature, ask some users whether it would be a substantial gain to have one. Look at different ways to categorize product and build new filters. Then look at how they get used, and make further changes based on those results. You may end of up with something that not only makes it easier for your customers to find the products they are looking for, but a significant differentiation over your competition.
Your funnel is now ready for the world (assuming of course you have a great offer, amazing copy, and a hot market). For more information on how to create great offers, great copy, and great funnels, check out expertsecrets.com and dotcomsecrets.com. Are there any things you do before launching a funnel that I’ve missed? Let me know in the comments below!
First, from the product page, the Add to Cart button should be highly visible. Next, the shopping cart should be easy to locate—usually positioned in the sidebar, or the top-right. The checkout page should be super-easy to access, and never more than one click away, allowing a visitor to bypass the shopping cart if they want. Finally, the checkout fields should be logical, and kept to a minimum.
Be aware that your URL affects your search engine ranking, so if you want to be found for “shoe,” it’s a good idea to fit “shoe” into your domain name. One way to do this is to use your brand name along with a keyword term. So MillerShoe tends to work better than FantasticShoe.com. (Which is why MillerShoe is taken, but FantasticShoe is still available.)
Checklists have been used in healthcare practice to ensure that clinical practice guidelines are followed. An example is the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist developed for the World Health Organization and found to have a large effect on improving patient safety[2] and subsequently found to have a nil effect in a cohort of hospitals in the Province of Ontario in Canada.[3] According to a meta-analysis after introduction of the checklist mortality dropped by 23% and all complications by 40%, higher-quality studies are required to make the meta-analysis more robust.[4] However, checklist use in healthcare has not always met with success and the transferability between settings has been questioned.[5] In the UK, a study on the implementation of a checklist for provision of medical care to elderly patients admitting to hospital found that the checklist highlighted limitations with frailty assessment in acute care and motivated teams to review routine practices, but that work is needed to understand whether and how checklists can be embedded in complex multidisciplinary care.[6]
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