If your eCommerce sells big brand names be sure to include their logo wherever possible. Having logos of big brands gives the customer an indication of what type of product you sell — plus, it adds some authenticity and prestige to your brand for being affiliated with industry leaders. Here’s an example of how Best Buy utilizes logos on their site:
Be aware that your URL affects your search engine ranking, so if you want to be found for “shoe,” it’s a good idea to fit “shoe” into your domain name. One way to do this is to use your brand name along with a keyword term. So MillerShoe tends to work better than FantasticShoe.com. (Which is why MillerShoe is taken, but FantasticShoe is still available.)
Look in the general settings “redirect” area to make sure there isn’t a redirect override that you don’t want (this happens when you clone funnels or templates and you forget!).This feature is handy, but maddening if you accidentally use it! When someone clicks SUBMIT on a button, regardless of what that action is on the button, the redirect override setting makes it so they go to THAT URL. Make sure there isn’t a URL in there (unless you meant to do it)!
Besides including products that are in a promotion, include products which are best sellers or even featured. You can even add a list of products which are suitable for your customer. This can be achieved in a number of ways; you can select products manually or automate the selection based on a different criteria (i.e. “customers also purchased…”).
In response, some people choose terribly cumbersome names. They find out that “Tshirt.com” is taken and then learn that “HockeyTshirt.com” is also taken. So they create an unworkable domain name like VeryCool-HockeyTshirt.com. Not only is it too long, it contains a hyphen, which should be avoided (some users forget to put them in, sending them to your competitor’s site.)
Excessive dependence of checklists may hinder performance when dealing with a time-critical situation, for example a medical emergency or an in-flight emergency. Checklists should not be used as a replacement for common sense. Intensive training including rote-learning of checklists can help integrate use of checklists with more adaptive and flexible problem solving techniques.[citation needed]
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