^ Bergs, J; Hellings, J; Cleemput, I; Zurel, Ö; De Troyer, V; Van Hiel, M; Demeere, JL; Claeys, D; Vandijck, D (Feb 2014). "Systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of the World Health Organization surgical safety checklist on postoperative complications". The British Journal of Surgery. 101 (3): 150–8. doi:10.1002/bjs.9381. PMID 24469615.


I find it clear and concise but some of the steps are not instinctive for newbies like myself so I'm stuck searching and learning and sometimes wasting time for little details that I'm sure are just mishaps or a lack of experience on my part regarding terminology… I hope I'm not offending anyone, I love the list but now I'm a little lost as to where I find my answers. I was suppose to launch 5 days ago and I really need this.


Checklists have been used in healthcare practice to ensure that clinical practice guidelines are followed. An example is the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist developed for the World Health Organization and found to have a large effect on improving patient safety[2] and subsequently found to have a nil effect in a cohort of hospitals in the Province of Ontario in Canada.[3] According to a meta-analysis after introduction of the checklist mortality dropped by 23% and all complications by 40%, higher-quality studies are required to make the meta-analysis more robust.[4] However, checklist use in healthcare has not always met with success and the transferability between settings has been questioned.[5] In the UK, a study on the implementation of a checklist for provision of medical care to elderly patients admitting to hospital found that the checklist highlighted limitations with frailty assessment in acute care and motivated teams to review routine practices, but that work is needed to understand whether and how checklists can be embedded in complex multidisciplinary care.[6]
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