Now that you’ve created your site and have taken into account the feedback of your first set of members, it’s time to start promoting to a wider audience. We’ve published lots of useful content covering this topic, including some simple SEO strategies for membership sites, as well as a guide to creating a buzz around your program.  Then there’s social media marketing to consider, not to mention starting a blog to attract more of your target audience.
Be aware that your URL affects your search engine ranking, so if you want to be found for “shoe,” it’s a good idea to fit “shoe” into your domain name. One way to do this is to use your brand name along with a keyword term. So MillerShoe tends to work better than FantasticShoe.com. (Which is why MillerShoe is taken, but FantasticShoe is still available.)

With time, you might consider using an affiliate marketing program, in which other sites get paid a percentage of each sale they send you. But it’s questionable whether a brand new site will benefit from an affiliate program. Although some new sites have profited, many new sites has yet to build the name recognition that makes using affiliates profitable.


Don’t worry about making everything perfect at the outset. As the old saying goes, done is better than perfect, and the sooner you launch your membership site, the sooner you’ll find out if it’s what your target audience wants. It’s fine to return to this step later and work on making your membership website look more professional once you've got some traction.

Clear & Concise Part 2: Product descriptions can be a wealth of information for your customers about your product. It also has the added benefit of helping you with Search Engine Optimization. New products should not necessarily get all of the copy-writing time. Consider re-working existing product descriptions that are top sellers too. Never skimp here. Hire someone if that is how it will get done.
Of course, you will ‘sell’ this offer with professional sales copy, some great headlines, and maybe even some bullet points. But the general idea here is to introduce yourself to this new cold traffic visitor, let them know what you are about, let them know that you can help them, and convince them that the first step to solving their problem is to opt-in to your free offer. 
Building a loyal community isn’t just about installing a forum or starting a closed Facebook group and calling it a day. It’s about making your members feel like they’re a part of something bigger than themselves, making them feel like their part of an elite or inner circle, making them feel special and valued, and giving them a sense of belonging. And this checklist shows you how to do all of this and more!
Now that you’ve created your site and have taken into account the feedback of your first set of members, it’s time to start promoting to a wider audience. We’ve published lots of useful content covering this topic, including some simple SEO strategies for membership sites, as well as a guide to creating a buzz around your program.  Then there’s social media marketing to consider, not to mention starting a blog to attract more of your target audience.

Checklists have been used in healthcare practice to ensure that clinical practice guidelines are followed. An example is the WHO Surgical Safety Checklist developed for the World Health Organization and found to have a large effect on improving patient safety[2] and subsequently found to have a nil effect in a cohort of hospitals in the Province of Ontario in Canada.[3] According to a meta-analysis after introduction of the checklist mortality dropped by 23% and all complications by 40%, higher-quality studies are required to make the meta-analysis more robust.[4] However, checklist use in healthcare has not always met with success and the transferability between settings has been questioned.[5] In the UK, a study on the implementation of a checklist for provision of medical care to elderly patients admitting to hospital found that the checklist highlighted limitations with frailty assessment in acute care and motivated teams to review routine practices, but that work is needed to understand whether and how checklists can be embedded in complex multidisciplinary care.[6]
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